A History Of The Raspberry Pi

By 4th March 2015Technology

A History Of The Raspberry Pi

Introduction

You may have heard in the news of a credit sized card computer that is taking the world by storm? If not here is a full history of the Raspberry Pi and an insight into uses for the device from the easy projects to the indepth harder projects.

 

The History

The Raspberry Pi was created in Febuary 2012 by the Raspberry Pi Foundation, Oringially setup to promote and teach basic cimputer science in schools and colleges around the UK. They initially released 2 Devices the Model A and the Model B, these computers ranged in spec and cabilities. Soon after the release of these products a community was formed and thousends of “Tech-Heads” (Including me!) bought one and started to create new projects with it, for instance one of the first things I did was setup a Home Media Centre and played the popular game Minecraft.

The products were so popular due to their cost ranging from $25 – $35 (£17 – £23) they were efficient and durable which made them easy to modify and crate projects on, The device ran Linux a popular OS for developers due to it being open-source.

On the Raspberry Pi website they created 2 images that could be installed easily onto a sd card which would then act as the OS for the device, one of the images was based off of Debian a popular lightweight Linux OS and was called Raspbian, the other was called Raspbmc and was based off the popular media centre software Kodi (Formally known as XBMC).

In Feburary 2014 they had been reported to have sold 4.5 millions boards, soon after this success they released the Model A+ and Model b+ which provided more GPIO’s and used less power to run. In early 2015 the Raspberry PI 2 was announced with increased Mhz by 200 to bring it to 900Mhz and doubled the ram to make it 1GB.

Products Spec

RP1 Model A

CPU: 700 MHz ARM1176JZF-S single-core with ARMv6 CPU architecture

Memory: 256mb

USB ports: 1

Video Output: HDMI (rev 1.3 & 1.4), 14 HDMI resolutions from 640×350 to 1920×1200 plus various PALand NTSC standards, composite video (PAL and NTSC) via RCA jack

GPIO: 8

Power Ratings: 300mA (1.5w)

Power Source: 5V Micro USB

Size: 85.60 mm × 56.5 mm (3.370 in × 2.224 in) – not including protruding connectors

 

RP1 Model A+

CPU: 700 MHz ARM1176JZF-S single-core with ARMv6 CPU architecture

Memory: 256mb

USB ports: 1

Video Output: HDMI (rev 1.3 & 1.4), 14 HDMI resolutions from 640×350 to 1920×1200 plus various PAL and NTSC standards, composite video (PAL and NTSC) via 3.5 mm TRRS jackshared with audio out

GPIO: 17

Power Ratings: 200mA (1w)

Power Source: 5V Micro USB

Size: 65 mm × 56.5 mm (2.56 in × 2.22 in) – (same as HAT board) and 10 mm high

 

RP1 Model B

CPU: 700 MHz ARM1176JZF-S single-core with ARMv6 CPU architecture

Memory: 512mb

USB ports: 2

Video Output: HDMI (rev 1.3 & 1.4), 14 HDMI resolutions from 640×350 to 1920×1200 plus various PAL andNTSC standards, composite video (PAL and NTSC) via RCA jack

GPIO: 8

Power Ratings: 700mA (3.5w)

Power Source: 5V Micro USB

Size: 85.60 mm × 56.5 mm (3.370 in × 2.224 in) – not including protruding connectors

 

RP1 Model B+

CPU: 700 MHz ARM1176JZF-S single-core with ARMv6 CPU architecture

Memory: 512mb

USB ports: 4

Video Output: HDMI (rev 1.3 & 1.4), 14 HDMI resolutions from 640×350 to 1920×1200 plus various PAL and NTSC standards, composite video (PAL and NTSC) via 3.5 mm TRRS jackshared with audio out

GPIO: 17

Power Ratings: 600mA (3w)

Power Source: 5V Micro USB

Size: 85.60 mm × 56.5 mm (3.370 in × 2.224 in) – not including protruding connectors

 

RP2 Model B

CPU: 700 MHz ARM1176JZF-S single-core with ARMv6 CPU architecture

Memory: 512mb

USB ports: 4

Video Output: HDMI (rev 1.3 & 1.4), 14 HDMI resolutions from 640×350 to 1920×1200 plus various PAL and NTSC standards, composite video (PAL and NTSC) via 3.5 mm TRRS jackshared with audio out

GPIO: 17

Power Ratings: 600mA (3w)

Power Source: 5V Micro USB

Size: 85.60 mm × 56.5 mm (3.370 in × 2.224 in) – not including protruding connectors

 

 

Projects

There has been many projects on the raspberry pi some of which include:

  • Web servers
  • Media Centres
  • Nas Devices
  • Routers
  • Arcade Machines
  • And much more

 

My favourite is the Media Centre option, I have used XBMC for many years now before the Raspberry Pi was out but now I have the Pi I can have a small device that sits behind the TV that turns it into a Media Centre, where using the XBMC Remote I can access all my films and TV shows remotely from any room in the house.

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Conor Lyons

Author Conor Lyons

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