Why Websites Are Not A COST To Your Business!

By 23rd April 2014Business, Essex, Web Design

Why Websites Are Not A COST To Your Business!

Cost:

‘an amount that has to be paid or spent to buy or obtain something’

Two words that resonate from that definition by Google are:

• Paid
• Spent

Well what do those words mean?

Paid:
• To give
• To settle
• To suffer in retribution
• To transfer money
• To repay
• To pay in debt

Spent:
• Used up; Consumed
• Having come to an end
• Depleted of energy
• Tired; Worn Out; Exhausted
• Used Up, Consumed

Do these sound like words you want to use to describe the process of acquiring your businesses most valuable asset?!

Nova Digital Media have coined a phrase we use to describe the commercial release of funds to create a digital presence online for your business:

Corporate Digital Investment

Why use “’Investment’ to describe a website?

Define Investment: (thefreedictionary.com)

• Property or another possession acquired for future financial return or benefit
• A commitment, as of time or support
• The act of investing effort
• A thing invested in such as a business

Sound more like the words you want to hear?

One of the largest problems Web Designers face when selling their wares is cost, as soon as you concern yourself with cost you are fighting a losing battle, there will always be someone else out there willing to offer cheaper website than you.

At Nova we sell on value, our websites are valuable assets that increase revenue and give your business a direct online benefit.

For example an ecommerce website that brings a business 40% of their revenue should have at least 40% of the marketing budget allocated to ensure that revenue is sustained right?

Then why oh why do most people buy on price and not return of investment?!

It’s crazy!!

The best analogy I’ve ever used to accurately describe this insane buy on price situation is the “Build me a house” model.

Picture, if you will, someone asking a builder they have never met before, “build me a house!”. The builder then a little surprised by this blunt request agrees reluctantly, then without anymore being said the Home owner follows up with a classic question…”Oh and how much will that be?”

How would the builder then explain what considerations need to go into building a house:

  • What plot of land to use and where?
  • Which Architect to use…?
  • What size is the house?
  • How many rooms?
  • What is the function of the rooms?
  • What materials are required (structurally / aesthetically)?
  • What materials are wanted (wood / metal / glass)?
  • Which professionals do you want working on the job?

Imagine the huge variables involved in the “costs” that are building up.

As you can imagine there are too many assumptions to make for the builder to simply pluck a figure from the air. Of course with experience the builder could say a figure and constrict the buyers dreams by fitting limiting their choices but we’re not building a house and we don’t believe in constraint.

One way to do it would be to say to the buyer, “My hourly rate is £xxx, resources are not included within that fee and I do not know how long the build will take.” Not a very comforting concept, you may as well hand the builder a signed cheque and let him fill out the amount.

Our considerations for Internet Marketing are in many ways the same as the builder but we have “revenues” coming back to consider building into your Internet strategy.

The main question is – How much money do you want to make from your website?

  • How big is the site?
  • What does the site do?
  • How much content have you got / do you need?
  • Do you have photos / Are they good enough?
  • Which coders will we need?
  • Will you need photography or copy writing services?

Consider we are building your online shop front, your 2-way communication with your clients and integrated marketing solutions to grow your business.

Deciding what is best for you and your business and what other external considerations need to be used in tandem with your website should not be something you rush into with the best “price”, and definitely not something taken without serious advice and consideration.

Long term goals, milestones and task need to be considered. Does the company you’re working with match your values and ideas? Are you comfortable with them? Do you trust them? Will they be there to support you in a year or two?

30% of all start-up businesses fail in the first year so it is important to consider if the company you’re working with is established, respected and most of all if you like the work they have done in the past.

Nova have adopted a very simple 4-stage process to guide our clients through the battle field of unlimited choice and infinite possibilities and it all begins with professional and serous consultancy in the form of a fact finding meeting. This meeting can be in person or over Skype or phone, and takes anything from 30 minutes or more.

After all we have no idea what you want to achieve from your website! Our mission is to fact find and discover what it is you would like to have, what you need and what you have to have to do to hit goals.

For example; Do you need to be found on Google for certain search terms? Do you have systems in place to sell you services internally? Do you have a CRM and would you like your web leads to be injected straight in? Do you use Social Media and if not which platforms would be best for you?

This is just the tip of the iceberg and there are plenty of other considerations to take into account as well.

If you want to have a serious Internet presence, if you need results driven solutions just call a company like Nova that acts professionally enough not to just take your money without question.

For clear blue-sky solutions for your business call Nova Digital Media or The Nova Agency Today on 01708553320.

Tags
Helena Walsh

Author Helena Walsh

If you have ANY questions regarding Social Media or any advice of your own let me know! Leave a comment below, Tweet me @_NovaHelena, leave a comment on our FB page or find me on LinkedIn.

More posts by Helena Walsh